18 days in Italy Itinerary

18 days in Italy Itinerary

Created using Inspirock Italy travel planner
Make it your trip
Fly
1
Catania
— 2 nights
Drive
2
Agrigento
— 1 night
Drive
3
Palermo
— 2 nights
Fly
4
Amalfi
— 4 nights
Drive
5
Civita
— 3 nights
Drive
6
Rome
— 5 nights
Fly

S M T W T F S
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29

Catania — 2 nights

The landscape surrounding Catania, a medieval city on Sicily's eastern coast, is dominated by Mount Etna, the tallest active volcano in Europe.
Start off your visit on the 13th (Thu): make a trip to Ancient Theatre of Taormina and then surround yourself with nature on Etna Passion. On your second day here, see some colorful creatures with Trigone Diving School, then test your problem-solving skills at popular escape rooms, and then walk around Villa Comunale.

For photos, other places to visit, traveler tips, and more tourist information, read our Catania sightseeing planning tool.

Toronto, Canada to Catania is an approximately 14-hour flight. The time zone difference moving from Eastern Standard Time (EST) to Central European Standard Time (CET) is 6 hours. Plan for a bit warmer temperatures traveling from Toronto in April, with highs in Catania at 23°C and lows at 9°C. Finish your sightseeing early on the 14th (Fri) to allow enough time to drive to Agrigento.
more
Wildlife · Outdoors · Tours · Fun & Games
Side Trips

Agrigento — 1 night

Historically one of ancient Greece's leading cities, Sicily's Agrigento is home to the seven monumental temples that make up the well-preserved Valley of the Temples.
Start off your visit on the 15th (Sat): take an in-depth tour of Collezione La Gaipa and then explore the ancient world of Valle dei Templi.

To find reviews, maps, ratings, and more tourist information, you can read our Agrigento day trip planning tool.

You can drive from Catania to Agrigento in 2 hours. Alternatively, you can take a bus; or take a train. Expect a bit warmer evenings in Agrigento when traveling from Catania in April, with lows around 15°C. Cap off your sightseeing on the 15th (Sat) early enough to go by car to Palermo.
more
Historic Sites · Museums

Palermo — 2 nights

The capital of Sicily, Palermo was founded by the Phoenicians under the name of Ziz.
Start off your visit on the 16th (Sun): indulge in some culinary diversions at a local gastronomic tour, then pause for some serene contemplation at Chiesa Inferiore della Cappella Palatina, and then take in the architecture and atmosphere at Church of San Cataldo. On the next day, pause for some serene contemplation at Cattedrale di Palermo, then admire the landmark architecture of Norman Palace, and then pause for some serene contemplation at Duomo di Monreale.

To see where to stay, maps, other places to visit, and other tourist information, refer to the Palermo trip itinerary planning site.

You can drive from Agrigento to Palermo in 2.5 hours. Alternatively, you can take a bus; or take a train. Cap off your sightseeing on the 17th (Mon) early enough to catch the flight to Amalfi.
more
Historic Sites · Tours
Side Trip

Amalfi — 4 nights

Known for its impressive hillside cascade of colorful stone buildings down to the Mediterranean shore, Amalfi is the cultural and commercial heart of southern Italy's Amalfi Coast.
Step out of Amalfi to go to Positano and see Il Sentiero Degli Dei, which is approximately 36 minutes away. Next up on the itinerary: steep yourself in history at Duomo di Ravello, take in the architecture and atmosphere at Duomo di Sant'Andrea, don't miss a visit to Vicoli, scale e archi, and take in nature's colorful creations at Villa Cimbrone Gardens.

To find ratings, reviews, other places to visit, and other tourist information, read our Amalfi holiday maker site.

Fly from Palermo to Amalfi in 2.5 hours. Alternatively, you can do a combination of train and taxi; or ride a ferry. In April, daily temperatures in Amalfi can reach 22°C, while at night they dip to 17°C. Finish your sightseeing early on the 21st (Fri) to allow enough time to travel to Civita.
more
Parks · Historic Sites · Scenic Drive · Spas
Side Trips

Civita — 3 nights

Civita is a hilltown and comune in the province of Cosenza in the Calabria region of southern Italy. Go for a jaunt from Civita to Laino Borgo to see Canyoning & Rappelling Tours about 1h 5 min away. The adventure continues: identify plant and animal life at Setteventi del Pollino, pause for some serene contemplation at Chiesa di S. Maria Assunta, get engrossed in the history at Museo delle Icone e della Tradizione Bizantina, and take in the views from Il ponte del diavolo.

To find photos, traveler tips, maps, and other tourist information, you can read our Civita itinerary planning app.

You can drive from Amalfi to Civita in 3 hours. Alternatively, you can drive. Wrap up your sightseeing on the 24th (Mon) early enough to travel to Rome.
more
Museums · Historic Sites · Adventure · Tours
Side Trips

Rome — 5 nights

Aptly nicknamed the Eternal City, Rome is the birthplace of the Roman Empire, one of the world's greatest civilizations ever.
Explore Rome's surroundings by going to Tivoli (Villa Adriana & Villa d'Este). There's much more to do: make a trip to St. Peter's Basilica, stop by Trastevere, explore the world behind art at Galleria Borghese, and contemplate in the serene atmosphere at Vatican Museums.

To find where to stay, reviews, more things to do, and more tourist information, refer to the Rome trip planning app.

Traveling by car from Civita to Rome takes 5 hours. Alternatively, you can drive; or do a combination of car and flight. In April, daily temperatures in Rome can reach 24°C, while at night they dip to 11°C. Finish up your sightseeing early on the 29th (Sat) so you can catch the flight back home.
more
Historic Sites · Museums · Neighborhoods · Childrens Museums
Side Trips

Italy travel guide

4.6
Landmarks · Ruins · Sacred & Religious Sites
Italy is a land of high fashion, fine art, exquisite architecture, luxury sports cars, outstanding cuisine--and an insatiable taste for "la dolce vita." It's also home to the greatest number of World Heritage Sites in the world, making it an ideal place for your next holiday. The country boasts a varied landscape of mountain ranges, alpine lakes, and coastal towns, so it's no wonder travelers often refer to it as the bel paese (beautiful country). With so many places to visit, visitors often have a difficult time planning their itinerary. The smaller villages each feature a distinct character and a blend of architecture, art, and cuisine. In the country, you'll find countless archeological sites dating back to Roman times and beyond. The country's cities and seaside resorts are cosmopolitan powerhouses with museums, galleries, restaurants, shops, open-air markets, and pedestrian-friendly historic areas.
more

Amalfi Coast travel guide

4.2
Sacred & Religious Sites · Landmarks · Gardens
Renowned for its beautiful landscape and medieval fishing villages that cling precariously to the Mediterranean cliffs, the Amalfi Coast is one of Italy's top vacation destinations. This World Heritage Site stretches for about 50 km (30 mi) on the southern side of the Sorrentine peninsula and offers numerous places to visit, from terraced lemon gardens and whitewashed villas to cliff-top views of the sea. Explore the coastline's towns, bays, and resorts. During the peak tourist season, the Amalfi Coast's single seaside road is often jammed with dozens of buses. For that reason, the ubiquitous scooter may be the best way to get around and sightsee. You can also access quite a bit by bicycle.
more

Calabria travel guide

4.4
Beaches · Landmarks · Castles
Forming the toe of Italy's "boot," Calabria is considered the Caribbean of Europe and may very well be the country's best-kept secret. Visitors can find everything from beaches to Byzantine churches here. Hillside towns, ancient Greek temples, and medieval castles and palaces are just some of the attractions scattered around one of the country's least-developed regions. Calabria remains largely unblemished by mass tourism, with many charming places to visit like olive plantations, orange groves, waterfalls, and lakes. Because it's bordered by the Mediterranean Sea on three sides, the water plays a huge role in the region's culture and cuisine. Calabria is also an up-and-coming producer of fine wines.
more