6 days in Province of Matera Itinerary

6 days in Province of Matera Itinerary

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Matera
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Matera

— 5 nights

Subterranean City

Famous for its resemblance to the ancient settlements of Jerusalem and Cappadocia, Matera remains one of the oldest inhabited cities in the world.
Matera is known for historic sites, museums, and nature. Your trip includes some of its best attractions: appreciate the extensive heritage of Sassi di Matera, pause for some serene contemplation at Cattedrale di Matera, examine the collection at Sassi in Miniatura, and gain a rich perspective with a tour of cultural highlights.

To find more things to do, maps, photos, and other tourist information, read Matera trip planner.

Milan to Matera is an approximately 3-hour flight. You can also drive; or take a train. Expect somewhat warmer weather when traveling from Milan in December: highs in Matera hover around 13°C, while lows dip to 3°C. Finish your sightseeing early on the 30th (Thu) to allow enough time to fly back home.

Things to do in Matera

Historic Sites · Museums · Parks · Nature

Province of Matera travel guide

4.3
Historic Walking Areas · Landmarks · Specialty Museums
Matera is a city and a province in the region of Basilicata, in Southern Italy. It is the capital of the province of Matera and the capital of Basilicata from 1663 to 1806. The town lies in a small canyon carved out by the Gravina.Known as "la Città Sotterranea" (the Subterranean City), its historical center "Sassi", along with the Park of the Rupestrian Churches, is considered a World Heritage Site by UNESCO since 1993.On 17 October 2014, Matera was declared Italian host of European Capital of Culture for 2019.HistoryThe area of what is now Matera has been settled since the Palaeolithic. The city was allegedly founded by the Romans in the 3rd century BC, with the name of Matheola after the consul Lucius Caecilius Metellus. In AD 664 Matera was conquered by the Lombards and became part of the Duchy of Benevento. In the 7th and 8th centuries the nearby grottos were colonized by both Benedictine and Basilian monastic institutions. The 9th and 10th centuries were characterized by the struggle between the Byzantines and the German emperors, including Louis II, who partially destroyed the city. After the settlement of the Normans in Apulia, Matera was ruled by William Iron-Arm from 1043.

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